Welcome to
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      /______________________ /    A 100% Anthropomorphic TinyMU*

Here is a basic walkthrough of building your character on TigerMUCK. First, I'll demonstrate how to set up your character's description, gender, and all those little tidbits that come in handy. Of course, since being homeless can be kinda cold, you'll also learn how to build a home on this MUCK. Some of the MUF and programs here are a little different than other MUCKs. The general theme of the area is a laid-back sort of rural town, where everybody knows everyone else, and is a perfect place for first-time MUCKers. Friendly and helpful people, peaceful and quiet, and a fairly basic programming structure that you don't have to be an expert to use. Just one to understand. ;) 

To separate the commands from the normal text so they stand out if you just want to skim through it, I've set the commands in a  lovely shade of green, and the normal text in the standard black. If, however, you'd like to skip the walkthrough and have a complete list of commands for your convenience, they can be found at the end of the document, or by clicking here.

Contents

Species, Gender, etc.
Scent
Setting up your description. The easy way.
Look Notify
build a one-room apartment
Look Trap Objects.
Building Furniture
Setting nifty @actions
Building multiple connected rooms.
Making Exits
Making them interesting
Dragon's MUF for double-checking




Personal Settings

Species, Gender, etc.

The furst and most basic settings would be your species and gender, which can be seen using the ws or whospe commands. TigerMUCK is a social MUCK with basically only one rule regarding species. No humans. Any other species is allowed, like dragons, wolves, bunnies, raccoons, etcetera. To set your chosen species, just type @set me=species: and type your chosen species after the colon. It's the same way with gender, although the command is @set me=sex: or @set me=gender: and just type male, female, boy, girl, herm, or whatever you would prefur.  One more  of course, since you can't actually smell someone when they're nothing but ASCII, you get to show your descriptive ability or just become more in-depth with your character.    Here's an example of what the whole deal would look like when typed up on the buffer. 

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Scent

Another setting that isn't really important, but is more of a just-for-fun type thing would be your smell. Typing this out can be a little more tricky, because scents can be hard to describe. Several furs tend to go almost poetic when writing up their scents, while most that I've seen just put 'smells like a -' and whatever their species is. The command for snuffling a fur would be sniff <name> or smell <name>, and the way you set your scent is by typing @set me=_scent: and whatever you want to smell like. You can also tell when somebody's sniffed you by typing in: @set me=_smell_notify:[>> %n just sniffed you! <<] An explanation on the notify and what the %n stands for can be found lower in this document.

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Setting up your description. The easy way.

A desc is pretty much mandatory. It demonstrates your writing ability, shows a bit of your personality, and helps furs know what your character looks like. To read a character's description, all you have to do is type look <name> and the words will scroll up on your screen. The list editor is a wonderful tool for editing descriptions. It has a more-or-less unlimited output, making for a chance to get pretty descriptive. It's advisable to keep your desc to less than 20 lines of 75 chars/line. That way those with dumb terms/raw telnet don't get flooded with more than will easily fit on a screen. Also, when it goes to multiple screens, most people tend to skip over your carefully written out description. To open the list editor, all you have to do is type lsedit me=mydesc and it'll bring up a prompt for you to start typing. As you input your desrpition, and you realize you want to change a line you just added, or want to remove it for some reason, just type .del and it'll remove the line most recently input. (There's a period (.) typed before every command in the list editor. If you forget the period, it'll just be added to your desc.)  However, if you would like to cancel the entire process and not save your work, just type .abort and you'll go back to the normal MUCKing. Once you're finished and satisfied with how it turned out, type .end and it'll save whatever changes you've made.  If you need help while in the editor, .h will bring up the help file on the program. Here's an example of a fairly decent layout, using my own normal fur morph. I chose to lay it out in three paragraphs, but it can be written however you feel. . Anyways, since the text will wrap on the page, I'll put a little <enter> whenever I press, you guessed it, enter.

Now that you have your description all typed out, I suppose you'd like to apply it to yourself. Well, that's the easy part, but there's a simple setting so that you can tell when someone has looked at you. It's a quick and simple bit of  MPI scripting added to your settings as well as your description. No, you don't have to reopen the list editor, this is added separately since it's a programming thread. 

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Look Notify

Furst you have to set the message for when someone looks at you. Just type @set me=_desc_notify_looked:[{name:me} just looked at you!] into the buffer and the message for you is set into place. What you'd actually be seeing, instead of {name:me} would be the name of whoever is looking. The {} demark a section of MPI code which reads the name of the fur looking at you and displays that in it's place. Instead of having the {name:me}, you could also type %N and that would accomplish almost the same thing, although tends to be altered with a simple command.  An addition to that is for letting the looker know that you know they took a look. The setting for that is  @set me=_desc_notify_looker:[%n knows you looked.] which as you can see is pretty much the same, excpet for a couple details. The  refers to your name this time, and is set that way to be dynamic just in case you feel like changing your name.  Now to make these two commands active and attach your description at the same time. Basically, you just have to type @desc me={look-notify:{list:mydesc}} and everything there is set. What you actually have there is a short dollop of MPI script. The look-notify tells the MUCK  to display the notify comments which have been typed earlier, and the list:mydesc tells the program to look through your morph list and display the one titled 'mydesc'. Simple, no? If you prefer the simple bare-bones command structure, just click here for the demonstration.

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Build your apartment

@dig the room

There are several options when building or choosing a home. There's an apartment complex overlooking the beach on the east side of TigerMUCK, and is owned by Mourdrin. To claim a home, just page #mail him with a request for an unoccupied apartment. The other option is to just make it yourself, which isn't as hard as you'd think. 

Preferably, you shouldn't build a home floating off in space that is disconnected from the primary MUCK area. Part of what we're trying to do is have a feel for a real community rather than a bunch of disconnected chat rooms, so please plan your home out completely before building it. Another thing is before you've even started building, page Tigerwolf and ask him if you can link your home to a certain spot somewhere in the main area of the MUCK, such as branching off of one of the currently constructed roads. It's best to ask beforehand, so you don't find out later that it's already full.

First step, of course, is to make something. Typing @dig home makes a room labeled 'home', for example. If this is done successfully, you should get 'room "home" created with dbref#<number>' Remember that number, you'll need it repeatedly. The only way to get to this room so you can edit it a little more comfortably would be to set it as your home. Just type in @link me=#<dbref#> where <dbref#> is actually the number of your room. Once that's set, the command gohome or home will take you to your brand new pad. Just as a suggestion, it would be a good idea if you called it So-and-so's lair, or something similar. Don't want a muckfull of 'home' rooms. 

Now that you've built your home, it would be probably be nice to describe it just in case visitors might come by. Describing the room is just like describing yourself. Just type lsedit <room name>=roomdesc and the rest is already covered. Again, as just a note, it would be advisable to type out the rough draft of the room's desc on a word processor before loading it into the MUCK. Since the room doesn't need a look-notify, the command for attaching the description is @desc home={list:roomdesc} 

Unlike on most mucks, TigerMUCK doesn't have a program for making exits visible in your room description, so it has to be done by hand. Just add the rooms to another line in the description, as well as their location. for example, one line of the exits for the central park looks like this:   Exits: Tiger Blvd (n)       Veterinarian's Office (ne)

Now here's the fun part. Either building a simple one-room cave or elaborate mansion complete with a surrounding countryside, you will have to find out a few more niggling details about building. For instance, is it outside or inside? What quadrant of the MUCK is it in? As soon as your home is planned, and the location thought out, you have to pay attention to this for all included rooms because there is an MPI that should be added to every room as it's being built. To relate if the room is indoors, you have to type @dig <room name>=$indoor, adding it to the digging command. If the room is outdoors, then you put @dig <room name>=$<parent>. The parent name has to be one of five places: foxlane, pantherdrive, river, tigerroad, or wolfrun. You really need to specify which section your home or building is in, and label each room as such, using the command . 

If you would like to leave the house and don't know how to get out, just type in the command park and it'll bring you right back to the central park. To review the commands in this section, just click here.

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Decorate your home

Look Trap Objects

Also, there's a 'look trap' in the server so that furs can decorate a room with lookable objects without actually creating an entire object. Saves on db space and won't run up the fur's object quota. Dragon can tell you how it works. @creating things should be limited to real and needed objects.

Building Furniture

Building furniture is like creating any other object. It's a very short list of instructions, the only one requiring much thought being your chosen description for whatever you may be building.* Anything could be made, from desk lamps to four-poster beds. It would be best to keep the object furniture minimal, you can easily just add the small decorative stuff to the room's description. (*As I'm sure you've noticed by now, the desc is considered one of the most important functions of laid-back MUCK denizens like myself. :)

Anyways, first step is @create couch which creates an object entitled 'couch'. The couch is placed in the collections of objects you're carrying, usually known as the inventory, type inv to check. The command drop couch to let it fall in the room with you, and @link couch=here sets that room as it's home.  To keep others from lifting your couch and carrying it away, type @lock couch=me and nobody else can be able to pick it up.

To describe your couch, all you need to do is type @desc couch=<text>. The lseditor isn't needed for simple objects, because the description of them shouldn't take up very much space. For simple objects, you should have a fairly simple description, since there isn't much point to being detail-oriented about a thingy that very few furs are likely to look too closely at.

Anyways, back to the matter at hand. Here's the command list of what I just said, in case anything was missed.

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Multiple Rooms

Chances are, if you want to show off your building skills to all and sundry, you'll want to make more than one room. It's fairly simple, and the only thing besides just @digging a bunch of rooms would be setting exits and making certain they work. 

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Making exits

Say you're standing in a room you just built. Already have it set to the proper environment and all that. Opening an exit between the two takes a simple command, which sets the exits in both rooms simultaneously. mbl <dir>=<destination db#> Where <dir> is one of the eight cardinal points (n, ne, e, se, s, etc.) This is best for an outdoor environment, where the directions are usually done by the compass. Indoors can be done like that as well, but another way is to go by room names or however you like. the 'mbl' command also does in/out. Quite handy, eh? :) 

If, however, you would like an exit that cane use multiple commands to get through (west, w, in, door), then you'd still have to open the exit manually. Say, you'd like to open a door from your kitchen to the dining area, and you would like the dining area to be east of it. Type @open east;e;d;dine;dining=#12345 where #12345 actually is the dbref# of the dining room. This'll open a one-way door from the kitchen to the dining room. To make the exit go both ways, go through the door into the dining room and repeat the procedure, only with the exit being something like west;w;k;kitchen=#31245 and #31245 is actually the number of the kitchen. 

If you like, here's the basic command list for your viewing pleasure.

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Making them interesting

 

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Dragon's MUF for double-checking

 

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Setting nifty @actions

To give that couch, or Tiffany lamp, or old shoe that your zombie chews on, some personality, 


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Page copyright © Ben Raccoon. All the stuff involving TigerMUCK is © Tigerwolf.

Special thanks to the park group of TigerMUCK and to the head wiz, Tigerwolf himself for teaching me the programs and how to use them, as well as their assistance with this walkthrough.